Time to Peel Away Apple Stickers

24 of #100DaysToOffload

I received the new iPhone 12 Pro Max today, and it is a beautiful device.

But there was something in the box I consider a waste.

At the risk of opening myself to criticism, I confess to being an #Apple fan. Don't get me wrong; I don't buy everything Apple releases. Apple's expensive products last for years.

However, after two years with the iPhone XS, I thought it was time to change. The iPhone XS had many more years of service remaining, the body was like new, and it worked as well as it did on day one.

But the #iPhone is one thing that comes with me everywhere, except to the toilet. And so I caved to temptation.

I was in the market for a small writing device, so instead of waiting for a new iPad Mini, I opted for the iPhone 12 Pro Max.

During the keynote presentation, Apple made a strong case for omitting the charger from the iPhone box. And sure enough, the new box is streamlined and comes with fewer materials. This can only be good for the environment.

However, the environmental policy fails on a couple of points.

First, I need a charger for the new iPhone, and while the 5W version, of which there many lying around the house, would work fine, I don't want to spend seven days bringing the 12 Pro Max to full charge.

Then there's MagSafe. I have never been a believer in wireless charging simply because the wireless charger needs plugged into power.

However, MagSafe for the Apple Watch is convenient. Just hold the iPhone over, and the magnet clings to the watch. I couldn't resist the same option for the new iPhone.

So dropping the charger has only meant I have purchased a new charger and, although unnecessary, another power cord with MagSafe.

But, the most significant anti-environment element to the new iPhone 12 package is the inclusion of a single Apple sticker.

I have always been puzzled by Apple stickers.

What do you do with the stickers, apart from sticking them on things? And I never have – I'd only get told off by my wife for vandalising the toilet, fridge door or living room window.

A quick look at the internet, and you can see I’m not alone.

Apple can sell over 200 million new iPhones a year. That's a lot of stickers. On top of that, you have the entire product range, each with trendy little stickers included.

Stickers made of plastic. Hundreds upon hundreds of useless bits of plastic.

Would the world miss them?


I’m publishing this as part of #100DaysToOffload. You can join in by visiting https://100daystooffload.com.


Find me: